Ludlow "The Perfect Historic Town"
Ludlow Castle & Dinham Bridge

A Town Full of History

A walk through Ludlow's main streets and quiet lanes is to walk through over 900 years of history. 

Ludlow's History
Broad Steet, Ludlow

Ludlow Castle

The construction of the Ludlow Castle started around 1085, with many later additions in the following two centuries. It is one of the most interesting castles in the Marches, in a dominant and imposing position high above the river Teme.

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The Inner Bailey, Ludlow Castle
Broadgate, Ludlow
The Buttercross, Ludlow

Shropshire Hills

Situated on the edge of The Shropshire Hills, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Ludlow is the perfect base to explore this glorious area.

Things To Do near Ludlow
High Vinnalls, near Ludlow

Enjoy the View

With many beautiful buildings and fantastic views, Ludlow is a great place for a stroll.

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Ludlow viewed from Whitcliffe
Market Steet, Ludlow

Ludlow

Things to do Near Ludlow

Within easy driving distance of Ludlow are the following attractions:


Ironbridge Gorge Museums

Ironbridge

Ironbridge Gorge Museums are a series of museums, spread along the banks of the River Severn, paying tribute to what happened in this great valley two hundred and fifty years ago. The first iron wheels, the first iron rails and even the first steam railway locomotive were all made here, as well as the world's first Iron Bridge.

Once described as "the most extraordinary district in the world", the Ironbridge Gorge is still a remarkable, and beautiful, place to visit today. A huge amount of early industry survives as furnaces, factories, workshops, canals and the settlements of Coalbrookdale, Ironbridge, Jackfield and Coalport.

See the products that set industry on its path and the machines that made them. Watch and talk to the Museums' craftsmen and costumed demonstrators as they work iron, fashion china and glass, and bring alive the people who lived and worked here.

Blists Hill Victorian Town


The 10 museums consist of Blists Hill Victorian Town, Enginuity, Coalport China Museum, Jackfield Tile Museum, Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron, Museum of The Gorge, Darby Houses, Tar Tunnel, The Ironbridge & Tollhouse, Broseley Pipeworks. An Annual Passport Ticket is available to visitors as well as tickets for the individual museums.

Click here for more information about Ironbridge Gorge Museums.

The Ironbridge Gorge is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Driving Time: approx 30 Mins
www.ironbridge.org.uk


The Severn Valley Railway

Severn Valley Railway

The Severn Valley Railway is a full-size standard-gauge railway line running regular steam-hauled passenger trains for the benefit of visitors and enthusiasts alike between Kidderminster in Worcestershire and Bridgnorth in Shropshire, a distance of 16 miles. The route follows the course of the River Severn for most of the way on its journey between Kidderminster and Bridgnorth.

Ticket, route and timetable details are available from their website.

Driving Time: approx 30 Mins
www.svr.co.uk


Witley Court

Witley Court

A hundred years ago, Witley Court was one of England's great country houses, hosting many extravagant parties. Today it is a spectacular ruin, the result of a disastrous fire in 1937.

Following the fire in 1937 the Witley Estate fell into long decline. English Heritage has restored the south garden and in addition, Wolfson Foundation funding has assisted with major restoration works in the East Parterre garden.

Parking, gift shop, cafe, toilets and childrens play area available.

Ticket prices, opening times and other visitor information is available on the English Heritage website.

English Heritage
Driving Time: approx 30 Mins
www.english-heritage.org.uk


Berrington Hall

Berrington Hall

The classic English country house, almost perfect both inside and out. A masterpiece by Henry Holland, set in a magical Lancelot 'Capability' Brown parkland setting.

National Trust managed with superb rooms and informative volunteer guides. The story of the house and its successive resident families the Harleys', the Digbys' and the Cawdors between the 1780s and the 1950's is riveting and compelling. Also open to the public are the gardens and grounds, the lake, shop, cafe. Various events are held throughout the year. For more information please visit their website.

National Trust
Driving Time: approx 10 Mins
www.nationaltrust.org.uk/berrington-hall


Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle is one of the finest and best preserved 13th-century fortified manor house in England. It offers visitors a unique glimpse into a distant age, when strength and elegance were combined.

The castle, timber-framed gatehouse and parish church make an enjoyable visit.
Cafe, shop, toilets, picnic area and parking.

English Heritage
Driving Time: approx 10 Mins
www.english-heritage.org.uk



Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre

Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre

Welcome to the Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre

The award winning visitor attraction, voted as the Going Places, 'Midlands Family Attraction of the Year 2017'.

Take a stroll in our meadows, relax in our cafe and learn about the wonders of the Shropshire Hills landscape and history, including the best places to go, eat and stay. Get up close and personal to Shropshire’s larger than life mammoth and step back into the Iron Age.

Enjoy our panoramic film, flying over the Shropshire Hills - You can see all the best bits and get the finest views without leaving the ground or climbing a single hill!

Set in a unique grass roofed building, the Discovery Centre has a popular café, with free WIFI, serving local lunches, frothy coffees & Shropshire cream teas - Eat in, eat out or take-away (perfect for a picnic)!

Just outside, there’s our 30 acre Onny Meadows, well signposted for gentle strolls along riverside paths, through wild flowers and woodland. Well behaved dogs are welcome so everyone can stretch their legs.

We are open daily throughout the year 10am - 5pm.

Driving Time: approx 10 Mins
www.shropshirehillsdiscoverycentre.co.uk


Powis Castle

Powis Castle

The world-famous garden, overhung with enormous clipped yews, shelters rare and tender plants. Perched on a rock above the garden terraces, the medieval castle contains one of the finest collections in Wales. It was originally built c.1200 by Welsh princes and was subsequently adapted and embellished by generations of Herberts and Clives, who furnished the castle with a wealth of fine paintings and furniture. A beautiful collection of treasures from India is displayed in the Clive Museum

National Trust
Driving Time: approx 45 Mins
www.nationaltrust.org.uk/powis-castle


Acton Scott Working Farm

Acton Scott Working Farm

Acton Scott Historic Working Farm is a wonderful visitor attraction for all the family to enjoy and experience daily life on an upland farm over 100 years ago.

The farm offers a fascinating insight into rural life at the turn of the 19th century. There are daily demonstrations of period skills and visits from the Wheelwright, Farrier and Blacksmith. As seen on the BBC2 programme 'Victorian Farm'

Cafe, toilets, parking & picnic areas available.

Driving Time: approx 20 Mins
www.shropshire.gov.uk/acton-scott


Carding Mill Valley

Carding Mill Valley

An extensive area of historic upland heath, part of the Long Mynd and with stunning views across the Shropshire and Cheshire plains and Black Mountains. This is excellent walking country with much of interest to the naturalist.

The Chalet Pavilion in Carding Mill Valley offers information about the area, as well as a cafe and shop. Toilets and parking available

National Trust
Driving Time: approx 25 Mins
www.nationaltrust.org.uk


Croft Castle

Croft Castle © Copyright David Fleming

Croft Castle is a castellated manor house set in open countryside with panoramic views

Home to the Croft family for nearly 1,000 years it is situated in lovely Herefordshire countryside on a 1500 acre estate of woodland, farm and parkland. In the castle you can view the fine Georgian interiors.

Parking, shop, toilets, cafe and childrens play area available

National Trust
Driving Time: approx 15 Mins
www.nationaltrust.org.uk/croft-castle


Ironbridge

an Unesco World Heritage Site

Stokesay Court

Stokesay Court

A guided tour of Stokesay Court offers a unique opportunity to see a virtually untouched Late Victorian interior. Set in stunning countryside with wide ranging views just outside Ludlow, the house was the location for the film "Atonement", with decor and artefacts from the film on display throughout the house and gardens.

The house tour includes rooms and displays which tell the story of the role Stokesay Court played as an auxiliary military hospital. Research into Stokesay Court’s intact archives have revealed touching personal narratives of some of the wounded soldiers that were nursed by the Commandant and home owner, Mrs Rotten. Visitors are welcome to explore the grounds following the tour.

Driving Time: approx 10 Mins
www.stokesaycourt.com


Wigmore Castle

Wigmore Castle

Once the stronghold of the Mortimer family, Wigmore Castle was later partly dismantled to prevent its use during the Civil War, it is now a picturesque ruin.
Free admission.
Free Parking available in the village, please follow the signs.

For more information about Wigmore Castle please click here.

English Heritage
Driving Time: approx 15 Mins
www.english-heritage.org.uk


Clun Castle

Clun Castle

The ruins and extensive earthworks of a Welsh Border castle, a 13th century keep is unusually set on the side of its motte. Situated on the edge of the village of Clun, local facilities include parking, shops, cafes, pubs and toilets.
Free admission.

English Heritage
Driving Time: approx 30 Mins
www.english-heritage.org.uk


Hopton Castle

Hopton Castle

A ruin since the early 18th century, it was partially restored between 2006 and 2011. Substantial remnants of the much altered keep remain. Hopton Castle featured in the British TV series Time Team in 2010.
Free admission.
Free parking for cars available.

Driving Time: approx 30 Mins
www.hoptoncastle.org.uk


Shrewsbury

Shrewsbury

Set amidst glorious countryside near to the Welsh Borders, Shrewsbury is one of England's finest historic market towns. Black and white timber mansions dating back to the 1400's line the narrow medieval cobbled streets of the town centre.

Shrewsbury is the County Town of Shropshire and also a thriving shopping centre serving Shropshire and Mid-Wales.

Driving Time: approx 45 Mins
www.shrewsburyguide.info



Hereford Cathedral & The Mappa Mundi

Hereford Cathedral © Copyright Jeff Buck and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Hereford Cathedral is full of surprises. It houses many treasures: the world-famous Mappa Mundi, the Chained Library, wonderful carvings in stone and wood, fine tapestries, and beautiful stained glass - many monuments and relics of the lives of faithful Christians who have worshipped here for over eight centuries.

The Cathedral is an active place of worship and parts of the building may be restricted due to special services, funerals or events that take place throughout the year.

The award-winning Mappa Mundi & Chained Library Exhibition is open all year round (apart from a prolonged period in January each year when it is closed for cleaning).

Driving Time: approx 40 Mins
www.herefordcathedral.org


Acton Burnell Castle

Acton Burnell Castle

Tucked away in a quiet part of Shropshire is the graceful red sandstone shell of Acton Burnell Castle. It was built between 1284 and 1293 by Bishop Burnell, Edward I's Lord Chancellor, and Parliaments were held here twice, in 1283 and 1285. By 1420, the castle was abandoned, and it was allowed to decay while a new house, Acton Burnell Hall, was built beside it. Nonetheless, the castle remains an impressive example of a medieval fortified manor house.

Free Admission
Free Parking Available

English Heritage
Driving Time: approx 35 Mins
www.english-heritage.org.uk


Wroxeter Roman City

Wroxeter Roman City

Discover urban-living 2,000 years ago at Viriconium (Wroxeter) - once the fourth largest city in Roman Britain. Wander the remains of the bathhouse and explore a reconstructed town house from a city which was almost as large as Pompeii. Discover the daily lives of the people who lived here with the audio tour and through their objects - found here and on display in the museum.

Parking Available
Toilets
Shop
Picnic Area

English Heritage
Driving Time: approx 40mins
www.english-heritage.org.uk


Wenlock Priory

Wenlock Priory

The tranquil ruins of Wenlock Priory stand in a picturesque setting on the fringe of beautiful Much Wenlock. An Anglo-Saxon monastery was founded here in about 680 by King Merewalh of Mercia, whose abbess daughter Milburge was hailed as a saint. Her relics were miraculously re-discovered here in 1101, attracting both pilgrims and prosperity to the priory.

By then Wenlock had been re-founded by the Normans as a priory of Cluniac monks. It is the impressive remains of this medieval priory which survive today, everywhere reflecting the Cluniac love of elaborate decoration. Parts of the great 13th century church still stand high.

Much Wenlock was also the home of Dr. William Penny Brookes (1809-95), originator of the still-continuing Wenlock Olympian Games, a major inspiration for the modern International Olympics.

English Heritage
Driving Time: approx 30mins
www.english-heritage.org.uk


The Shropshire Hills

An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

The Shropshire Hills AONB

Ludlow is on the southern edge of The Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. This landscape of diversity and contrast created by varied geology, the Shropshire Hills provide a dramatic link between the Midlands and the Welsh mountains. Of the hills themselves, the craggy Stiperstones and Wrekin, the moorland plateau and valleys of the Long Mynd, the quarried Clee Hills, the wooded Wenlock Edge and the rolling Clun Forest all have their own character.

The Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty was designated in 1958 and covers an area of 802 square kilometres, extending from the Wrekin to the Clun Forest and from the Stiperstones across to the Clee Hills. The Shropshire Hills AONB is nationally important, and its key special qualities are the diversity and contrast of its landscape, its hills, farmland, woods and rivers, the important geology, wildlife and heritage they hold, plus scenic quality and views, tranquillity, culture and opportunities for enjoyment.
(Extract from www.shropshirehillsaonb.co.uk website)

For more information please visit the Shropshire Hills website